Thursday, April 28, 2011

Lithium Drive: Most U.S. Consumers Want to Buy an Electric Vehicle tnr.v, czx.v, lmr.v, rm.v,, sqm, cgp.v, abn.v, ura.v,,,, fmc, roc, lit, li.v, wlc.v, clq.v, res.v, ree,, nsany, f, gm,, dai, byddf, hev, aone, vlnc


  We have very interesting findings from Nielsen Energy survey - now most U.S. consumers are ready to buy Electric Cars! We guess that rising gas prices have made all the difference in this change of the sentiment.
  Cruising Electric Cars on our streets do help as well, Nissan Leafs and GM Volts are getting on the roads and making the best EV marketing possible.

"It is coming and every uptick in the Gas prices will bring more supporters to Electric Cars movement, U.S. used to be the land of the Free - now we have a chance to reclaim it from the Oil Lobby. Get off the Oil needle and help others to do so." 

"The Electric Cars investment space is getting hotter and big names are beginning to eagerly to pile in. The 5 million investment into the charging infrastructure from U.S. Department Of Energy could sound like a joke compare to China investing billions in Electric Cars or personal investments of some entrepreneurs in Lithium space, but it is one step at a time and names in this initiatives are more important than this amount.
  Once the guys from Google, Facebook and Twitter will move into Green Revolution our Lithium story will take off into parabolic rise - they have knowledge, technology and understanding that Electric Cars are the way forward. They will need to drive their kids to the soccer games after all, even after Peak Oil which is happening now. We do not know which one of them will make the next Coca Cola in Electric Cars space, but we will be ready with our Sugar business - Lithium will be needed for all of them."


Apr 26, 2011
Plug-in electric vehicles may just be entering the market, but most U.S. consumers are ready to buy them. E Source recently analyzed data from the Nielsen Energy Survey and found that 85 percent of U.S. consumers say they would purchase a battery-driven car either right away (3 percent), when their current car needed replacement (57 percent), or when the technology is proven and it becomes more mainstream (25 percent). The caveat is that consumers strongly prefer (58 percent) plug-in hybrid electric (PHEV) versions such as the Chevrolet Volt. PHEVs have greater range than electric-only cars like the Nissan Leaf and only 8 percent of consumers prefer them. "We are seeing a substantial willingness for drivers to move to plug-in electric vehicles, but only if the manufacturers can provide the easy extended range of travel that Americans are used to," says Bill LeBlanc, senior advisor at E Source.
E Source also reports that younger drivers are more willing than older drivers to purchase the electric-only cars, and people who describe themselves as liberals are similarly more inclined to desire the all-electric cars than those classified as conservatives. "We see that all ages and all political mindsets like the plug-in hybrid vehicles equally," LeBlanc said. "But when it comes to the all-electric car, it appears to be seen as more of a 'green' purchase, rather than as a practical upgrade to a more-efficient vehicle."

Another factor that E Source looked at was how far people drive each day and how that affects their desire for a plug-in electric vehicle. Daily driving habits don't seem to affect desire for the all-electric vehicle; however, desire for the PHEV grows as people spend more time in their cars. "Overall, the survey supports the existence of a huge untapped market for electric vehicles that can be charged at night at home. People seem very ready to move to the next generation of cars and dramatically decrease the frequency of their visits to the gas station," LeBlanc said."
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